Warner, S. (2000). Final Survey Report. In Hillman, G., Warner, S. and Shute, J. (Eds.), Arts Programs for Juvenile Offenders in Detention and Corrections: A Guide to Promising Practices, (pp. 33-37). Washington, D.C.: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and National Endowment for the Arts.

Warner, S. (2000). Final Survey Report. In Hillman, G., Warner, S. and Shute, J. (Eds.), Arts Programs for Juvenile Offenders in Detention and Corrections: A Guide to Promising Practices, (pp. 33-37). Washington, D.C.: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and National Endowment for the Arts.

Author Affiliations: Experimental Gallery, Seattle
Artforms: Dance, drama, literary arts, multimedia, performing arts, visual arts Program: NA
Program Description: Survey of juvenile-offender arts programs
Program (Study) Location: National U.S.
Study Published: 2002
Participant Type: Juvenile-offender arts programs
Sample Size: 120 surveys mailed out, 24 returned: 20% response rate
Data Type: Quantitative: Survey instrument
Evaluation Focus: Art disciplines utilized, number of youth involved, kinds of artists employed, products generated, budgets, founding dates, challenges facing field, impediments to growth

Summary of Impact: Evaluation focused on institutional characteristics and benefits rather than benefits to offenders and found that:
●  Most programs offered a multidisciplinary arts education model using a combination of contracted professional artists, art teachers from the local school district and volunteers.
●  43.2% of programs were founded in the 1990s.
●  3 programs had a history of 30 years or more.
●  Slightly less than half the programs employed some kind of formal evaluation process to measure success.
●  18 out of 23 programs requested technical assistance with the evaluation, making evaluation the most requested service; fund-raising and curriculum and program design were the next most requested; the lowest response for assistance was in community relations.
●  Evaluation was considered the weakest area for most programs.
●  Slightly less than half the programs offered academic credit for their participants but three programs had no means in place to measure the success of this provision.
●  About half of programs had budgets of $100,000 and over and half less than $50,000
●  16.8% received funding support from a correctional facility.
●  Reports of numbers of youth served fluctuated between 3,000 — 12; actual numbers of youth being served by all 24 programs could not be determined.

KEYWORDS: dance, drama, Experimental Gallery, juvenile, literary arts, multimedia, performing arts, visual arts, youth

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